NATO is trying to bring Georgia the greatest possible support, Deputy Assistant Secretary-General says
NATO is trying to bring Georgia the greatest possible support, Deputy Assistant Secretary-General says

“NATO is trying to bring Georgia the greatest possible support and presence,” NATO Special Representative for the Caucasus & Central Asia Javier Colomina told the Georgian Public Broadcaster (GPB).

GPB asked Colomina, who visited Georgia and the region last week to discuss the impact of Russia’s war in Ukraine, to assess the risks for Georgian security in the regional context.

“We have seen how Russia has been acting in the last months, how it is using all the spectrum of attacks, cyber, hybrid, disinformation and, of course, the conventional weapons it is using in Ukraine,” Colomina said.

He highlighted a deep understanding of the concern that the Georgian society and politicians have towards Russia, willing to open a second front. However, NATO Special Representative for the Caucasus & Central Asia stressed it would have been a strong strategic mistake for Russia.

“I don’t believe that they are looking into doing that right now, and our assumption is that, of course, there is a risk all over, but we are trying to bring Georgia the greatest possible support and presence. My visit last week to make the visibility to the world that the NATO is actually supporting Georgia and to make that risk at lowest possible,” Colomina said.

Speaking of whether NATO is taking necessary steps in the light of the current situation, Colomina said that NATO decided to intensify support for those countries at the highest risk.

“One of the lessons learned from Russia’s war in Ukraine is how effective the training and support was bringing in Ukraine in the last years from the legal annexation of Crimea of 2014 to Russia’s war in the country. And because of that and the risks of Russia wanting to interfere or using malign instruments against some of our partner countries, we have decided to step up the support to those countries we believe are at greater risk or are just closer physically to Russia. It is the case of Georgia, Moldova, but a different case of Bosnia-Herzegovina,” a NATO representative explained.

Colomina added NATO is now working on new tailored measures for these three countries, meaning different sets of cooperation that would bring more practical cooperation, more military training, more political dialogue, and support.

“We are extremely satisfied with the cooperation that we have with Georgia, and we are ready to bring more to the table. We are right now working on that, and my assumption is that we will be able to probably agree on some of the measures during the summit in Madrid,” Javier Colomina said.

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